Tag Archives: chimamanda ngozi adichie

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie – The Afropolitan Anthropologist

This month the Afro-library is spotlighting Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, one of the best-selling contemporary writers of Afro-literary fiction.

I find Chimamanda to be one of today’s most introspective and insightful writers on race and culture. In addition to having a keen ability to create an engaging story, she unabashedly incorporates social commentary into each of her novels and short stories – sometimes, arguably, at the risk of artistic excellence. But the fact remains that her ability to conceptualize society’s idiosyncrasies is perhaps her greatest strength. She is the perfect example of an afropolitan author with the heart of an anthropologist.

After digging through the Afro-library bookshelves, we came up with a few samples that best illustrate Chimamanda’s unique voice. Check out these quotes, add your own, or simply tell us what you think of her work.

Fiction
“…humility had always seemed to him a specious thing, invented for the comfort of others; you were praised for humility by people because you did not make them feel any more lacking than they already did.” (Purple Hibiscus)

“He tried to visualize a heaven, a God seated on a throne, but could not. Yet the alternative vision, that death was nothing but an endless silence, seemed unlikely. There was a part of him that dreamed, and he was not sure if that part could ever retreat into an interminable silence. Death would be a complete knowingness, but what frightened him was this: not knowing beforehand what it was he would know.” (Half of a Yellow Sun)

“You did not want him to go to Nigeria, to add it to the list of countries where he went to gawk at the lives of poor people who could never gawk back at his life.” (The Thing Around Your Neck)

“Poverty was a gleaming thing; she could not conceive of poor people being vicious or nasty because their poverty had canonized them them, and the greatest saints were the foreign poor.” (Americanah)

TED Talks and Other Quotables
“Power is the ability not just to tell the story of another person, but to make it the definitive story of that person.”

“The single story creates stereotypes, and the problem with stereotypes is not that they are untrue, but that they are incomplete. They make one story become the only story.”

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under African Lit

Re-Blog: Love It or Hate It

Thanks to @lifeofafemalebibliophile for posting these questions!

Check out her link below: http://lifeofafemalebibliophile.wordpress.com/2013/11/07/book-tag-thursday-love-it-or-hate-it/

1. Biggest literary let-down?

– Toni Morrison’s long awaited comeback: Love, A Mercy, and Home 😦

2. Books that you liked that other people hated?

  • The Pillars of the Earth – Ken Follett

3. Best Quotes?

Not sure if these are my absolute favorites, but the below (afro-lit) quotes have been on my mind lately:

“This was love: a string of coincidences that gathered significance and became miracles”- Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Half of a Yellow Sun

“Love is like the rain . . . if you’re not careful it will drown you.” – Edwidge, Danticat, Breath, Eyes, Memory

“Don’t ever think I fell for you, or fell over you. I didn’t fall in love, I rose in it.” – Toni Morrison, Jazz

4. Worst Quotes?

Stumped on this one . . . sorry!

5. Books you didn’t finish?

I simply could not get into it…

    • The Kite Runner

***ducks for cover***

6. What book have you read the most times?

Toni Morrison’s The Bluest Eye (3 times . . . and it’s better each time)

7. Series where the first book was amazing but went downhill from there?

I was crazy about the Left Behind series when I was in high school.  I read the first four and then abandoned the brand :-(.  The made-for-tv movies are even worse.

4 Comments

Filed under Uncategorized